Leaving your lawn to grow long during May and June provides resources for butterfly and moth species to lay their eggs and grow. Lawns are a modern luxury, and turning them into wildflower meadows supports various grass and insect species.

Wildlife needs a help and No Mow May is an excellent way of helping, however big an area you have.

Highlights

  • Leaving your lawn to grow long in May and June supports butterfly and moth species to lay eggs and grow.
  • Lawns are a modern luxury, introduced in the mid-1700s as a status symbol, but the concept of a lawn is relatively new in human society.
  • Wildflower meadows, created by turning lawns into grasslands, support various grass and insect species.
  • Common grass species in lawns include Ryegrass, Yorkshire fog, Cocksfoot, and sweet vernal grass.
  • Moth and butterfly species like Meadow Brown, Speckled Wood, ringlets, Skippers, and marbled white feed on grass species in lawns.

The secret to growing meadows is to limit grass growth to allow other species to enter the sward. Start by removing cut grass (the arisings) for a few cuts. This decreases the nutrients available. You can then sow a suitable wildflower mix, or if there are plenty already in the grass, just allow them to grow on.

yellow rattle - No Mow May

To reduce grass vigour remove the arisings when you do cut. And if you are only going to cut in March and late summer consider growing Yellow Rattle , a grass hemi-parasite that will delight with their yellow flowers and reduce grass vigour as it does it.

The following video is from Plantlife

Tag: No Mow May

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