What To Sow In March: Radish
Radish Can Be Sown In March and thoughiut the year

Choosing What To Sow In March is Easy With This List. Check It Out, Choose Your Favourites & Sow Your March Fruit & Vegetables Choices


The following seeds and plants are what I’m going to be sowing and planting in my UK garden in March. However, this is a guide only. I’ll be flexing sowing dates subject to the weather and other factors. For example, if we get a cold snap and the forecast is better a week later then I’ll wait the week so that the seeds have the best possible conditions for the time of year. 
Choosing What To Sow In March is key to the whole gardening year if starting now. 

And don’t forget I’m in Sidmouth, Devon. My last frost date dictates a lot of what I do. You may need to adjust for your location and temperatures. 

 

Aubergine

March is a good time to start aubergine if you have a cold (unheated) greenhouse to plant them in. I’d delay a couple of weeks if you intend to plant in polytunnels as they are colder than glass and even longer for outside.

What to sow in March
What to sow in March : Aubergine

There’s no rush with aubergine as later sown seeds often catch up those sown a tad too early. 

 

Beetroot

Cheltenham beet are a long tapering variety resembling a parsnip. They yield well. But most of us grow standard globe type varieties. These now come in assorted colours as well as the standard beetroot red. Some even exhibit a concentric circle pattern when cut open. 

 

Broad Beans

Though they can be sown in November and throughout the winter there’s still time to get in one more sowing. Later sowings are however more prone to Black Army infestation .. ie aphid attack. The best remedy if you get it is to just pinch out the growing tips of the plants. 

Cabbage

Cabbage for summer/autumn harvest can be sown in March.  They can be ready for harvest early summer with good growing conditions.

 

Celeriac 

Celeriac need a long season so sow the seed under cover now. I prefer them sown in modules as they transplant so much easier.

 

Celery 

Celery don’t need such a long season as celeriac but can be sown in March. When I grew them commercially I sowed in February and would be planting them outdoors in March/April. They are very hardy. 

 

Brussels Sprouts 

Winter brassicas need a long growing season. So sowing now is ideal. You can sow a few undercover but later in March there’s no reason not to sow a seedbed full outdoors. They are usually much better quality plants when sown outdoors. 

 

But watch for flea beetles, slugs and butterflies. 

 

Capsicum (Peppers)

 

For cold glass and plastic this is early enough to sow, In fact later in the month rather than earlier is my advice if you are a newbie. 

 

Carrot

I’ve been sowing indoors for a few weeks now but March is a good time to sow outdoors. Sow every 2-3 weeks for succession and be careful in slicing your varieties. The long cylindrical varieties need deep stone free soil. If your soil isn’t perfect go for the stumpier varieties or even the “round” types. 

 

Cauliflower 

Cauli also needs a long season. So, depending on the variety and harvest season, you can sow now.

 

Chilli

The true aficionados will tell me it’s too late for chillies. But for unheated glass and plastic houses now is a good time. There are lots of varieties and colours to choose from. 

 

Herbs 

I’m going to include a whole host of herbs here rather than list them individually. Go for coriander, basil, oregano, sage, rosemary, parsley, lemon balm, thyme etc now. Some of these can be sown in future months as well as they are short lived, eg basil and coriander. 

 

And don’t forget coriander can be sown for leaf or seed. Just choose the variety best suited for the purpose. 

Technically not all the plants in my herb list are herbs. The linked article explains why  


We Aren’t Finished What To Sow In March Yet

 

Kohl rabi

They need early sowing and plenty of irrigation to do really well. But now is a good time to start them in a greenhouse or cold frame. 

 

Lettuce

Although I sow lettuce every month March always feels like a new season.  The choices are wide … go for Cos; Buttehead; true Crisp lettuce and Lakeland types; Little Gem types of miniature Cos  mixed leaves etc. 

 

Cos is my favourite and I prefer Lobjoits Green Cos. 

The more on How to Grow Lettuce here. 

 

Mizuna

I love this little salad veg. The leaf shapes intrigue me and it tastes so good.

 

Onion

Seed direct into the soil in rows or go for multi-seeded modules. As you might have guessed I prefer the latter.

 

Parsnip

Parsnip need a long season but are best direct-sown in situ. If you put them in modules there is a very strong chance the roots will twist around the inside of the module and never grow straight once planted.   

 

Peas

For pods, mangetout of peas shoots sow now and every few weeks. The careful planners will have had peas all winter for shoots and may even have an overwintered crop coming into flower before long. Peas are tougher than most people think. 

 

Radish

I’ve been sowing radish all winter but March is also a good time to sow them. Sow every few weeks to get a succession of crops. 

 

Rhubarb seed

The seed catalogues say now or even as late as April. I’ve ignored them and sowed mine in the autumn. But if you didn’t, now would be a good time.

 

Rocket

I start Rocket in modules but you can direct drill (sow) if you wish. 

 

Shallots

There’s still time to sow shallots outside or in modules. Multi-seeded “Figaro” shallots did me very well in recent years. Figaro are a banana shallot and I like them as they are easy to prepare in the kitchen. It’s as well to remember we have to prepare and eat what we grow. 

 

We are Getting to The End of What To Sow In March …What Comes Next?

 

Spinach

Where do I start? There are several types to try and I’ve not tried them all yet. We eat spinach raw in salads or cooked in dishes such as Saag aloo. 

 

Spring Onion

Sow now and every 3 weeks to get a long succession of spring onions. My favourite variety is White Lisbon. 

 

Direct sow in the soil or multi-sow in modules. I prefer the latter as it means I can pack more crops per bed each season.  

Tatsoi

Tatsoi are prone to bolt if they get too cold. But they are spring or late summer sown and tolerate a light frost.  So are ok if the conditions are not too cold.

 

 

Tomato

There’s still plenty of time to sow toms. I confess I did sow mine a few weeks ago and they are just showing the first true leaf. But it’s mild in my area and I’ve grown well over 100,000 toms in my time. Once I need to plant mine out in the unheated greenhouse I’ll be covering them with fleece at night if need be. AND there is a chance they will die on me. So I’ll be sowing a few more later .. just in case. 

 

The range of toms available today is huge. It’s now possible to buy grafted plants but I’m far from convinced that they are of any value whatsoever to gardeners. Even with my experience I’m not going to waste my money on them as they only perform well when given optimum conditions .. and in gardening situation that is rarely possible. 

 

Choose from cherry, traditional, beefsteak etc, in a range of fancy colours. 

 

I steer clear of F1 hybrids and go for the older heritage varieties as they tolerate garden conditions much better and have better flavour. With good conditions they also yield very well. 

 

My two favourites are Moneymaker and Gardeners’ Delight. Old varieties for a reason .. they believe the goods. 

  

 

Turnip

For leaves and/or roots now is the time to start sowing. Some varieties can go much later to give succession.

 

 

Watercress

Watercress is easy to germinate and simple to grow. I start it in recycled grape punnets and then prick them out into additional punnets, just 3-4 plants per punnet. Initially, I just keep the compost moist but from the first true leaf stage, I stand the trays in a shallow tray of water.  They respond well to warmth unless it gets very hot and growth is rapid once they have a few true leaves. After that just harvest a few leaves as you need them.

The leaves are wonderfully peppery and add an extra dimension to salads. 


Want More What To Sow In March Ideas?

Is This All I sow in March?

No, I’ll be adding a few more things over the next few days.

 

And don’t forget the daily info put on my Facebook Group.

 

 

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