The Renowned English Gardener, Gertrude Jekyll, Was Born In 1843 And Died In 1932. Even Today, Over 90 Years After Her Death, Her Books Are Read And She Is Inspiring Gardeners All Over The World With Her Practical And Artistic Approach To Life And Gardening.

Jekyll started her professional life in the art world, and only moved into garden design when here eyesight started to fail. But despite poor eyesight she had a superb understanding of colour and created around 400 gardens in the UK, Europe and America.

Jekyll was born of an age when well heeled people spent large sums on their gardens. Born in 1843 she continued work until her death in 1932. Her home was Munstead Wood, with its Grade I listed house and garden in Munstead Heath, near Godalming in Surrey. She created the garden, which is now open to the public between designing gardens of so many other people. Jekyll lived here, in this Arts and Crafts style house, from 1897 until 1932.

Gertrude Jekyll rose Dmitriy Konstantinov, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

The house has another connection with design. Its architect was Edwin Lutyens with whom she formed a professional partnership, designing the gardens of many Lutyens designed properties. Lutyens also designed New Delhi, and local to me, Castle Drogo, the last castle ever to be built in England. I know Drogo well from having worked there myself in the 80’s immediately before starting my market garden.

Jekyll has a rose named in her honour, aptly called, Gertrude Jekyll.

The video gives an insight into Gertrude Jekyll from an American perspective.

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Photo Attribution: Dmitriy Konstantinov, CC BY-SA 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

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